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New York: The Novel (Edward Rutherfurd Book)

Winner of the David J. Langum, Sr., Prize in American Historical Fiction Named one of the best books of the year by The Washington Post and “Required Reading” by the New York PostEdward Rutherfurd celebrates America’s greatest city in a rich, engrossing saga, weaving together tales of families rich and poor, native-born and immigrant—a cast of fictional and true characters whose fates rise and fall and rise again with the city’s fortunes. From this intimate perspective we see New York’s humble beginnings as a tiny Indian fishing village, the arrival of Dutch and British merchants, the Revolutionary War, the emergence of the city as a great trading and financial center, the convulsions of the Civil War, the excesses of the Gilded Age, the explosion of immigration in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the trials of World War II, the near demise of New York in the 1970s and its roaring rebirth in the 1990s, and the attack on the World Trade Center. A stirring mix of battle, romance, family struggles, and personal triumphs, New York: The Novel gloriously captures the search for freedom and opportunity at the heart of our nation’s history.


Humans of New York : Stories (Brandon Stanton Book)

Now a #1 New York Times Bestseller! In the summer of 2010, photographer Brandon Stanton began an ambitious project -to single-handedly create a photographic census of New York City. The photos he took and the accompanying interviews became the blog Humans of New York. His audience steadily grew from a few hundred followers to, at present count, over eighteen million. In 2013, his book Humans of New York, based on that blog, was published and immediately catapulted to the top of the NY Times Bestseller List where it has appeared for over forty-five weeks. Now, Brandon is back with the Humans of New York book that his loyal followers have been waiting for: Humans of New York: Stories. Ever since Brandon began interviewing people on the streets of New York, the dialogue he's had with them has increasingly become as in-depth, intriguing and moving as the photos themselves. Humans of New York: Stories presents a whole new group of people in stunning photographs, with a rich design and, most importantly, longer stories that delve deeper and surprise with greater candor. Let Brandon Stanton and the Humans of New York he's photographed astonish you all over again.


Fodor's New York City 2019 (Full-color Travel Guide) (Fodor's Travel Guides Book)

Written by locals, Fodor’s New York City is the perfect guidebook for those looking for insider tips to make the most out their visit to New York. Complete with detailed maps and concise descriptions, this travel guide will help you plan your NYC trip with ease. Join Fodor’s in exploring Manhattan, Brooklyn, and more.The lights, the sounds, the energy: New York City is the quintessential American city and unlike anywhere else in the world. It’s a constantly changing destination that people visit again and again. Fodor's New York City, with color photos throughout, captures the universal appeal of the city's world-renowned museums, iconic music venues, Broadway spectacles, and, of course, gastronomic delights.Fodor’s New York City includes:•UP-TO-DATE COVERAGE: This edition includes top new restaurant and hotel recommendations for Manhattan and the boroughs. Brooklyn coverage continues to grow, including hip and happening Williamsburg and Bushwick, classic Brooklyn Heights, leafy Fort Greene, and family-friendly Park Slope. Updated annually to ensure the best and most relevant content.•ULTIMATE EXPERIENCES GUIDE: A brief introduction and spectacular color photos capture the ultimate experiences and attractions throughout New York City.•PULLOUT MAP AND MORE DETAILED MAPS: over 35 detailed maps and a handy PULLOUT MAP to help you plan and get around stress-free.•GORGEOUS PHOTOS AND ILLUSTRATED FEATURES:Full-color features about New York City landmarks including the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, the 9/11 Memorial and Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the American Museum of Natural History make planning any trip a snap. A section on eating like a local highlights what's hot and what will never go out of fashion.•ITINERARIES AND TOP RECOMMENDATIONS: Sample itineraries help you plan and make the most of your time. We include tips on where to eat, stay, and shop as well as information about nightlife, sports, and the outdoors. Fodor's Choice designates our best picks in every category.•INDISPENSABLE TRIP PLANNING TOOLS: Features on what's where, best city tours, free things to do, and what to do with kids make it easy to plan a vacation. Easy-to-read color neighborhood maps and tips on buying Broadway tickets, getting tickets to sit in a TV audience, and scouting out the best shopping give easy access to the best New York City has to offer.•SPECIAL EVENT: Experience the electric atmosphere as 50,000 participants of the New York City Marathon run through the city’s five boroughs on the first Sunday in November.•COVERS: Metropolitan Museum of Art, Times Square, Empire State Building, Museum of Modern Art, Brooklyn Bridge, Statue of Liberty, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park, 9/11 Memorial & Museum, The High Line, and much more.•ABOUT FODOR'S AUTHORS: Each Fodor's Travel Guide is researched and written by local experts. Fodor's has been offering expert advice for all tastes and budgets for over 80 years.Planning to visit more of the northeast? Check out Fodor’s Boston, Fodor’s Philadelphia, Fodor’s Washington DC, and Fodor’s New England.


111 Places in New York That You Must Not Miss: Revised and Updated (Jo-Anne Elikann Book)

Part of the international 111 Places/111 Shopsseries with over 150 titles and 1 million copies in print worldwideFully illustrated with 111 full-page color photographsThe ultimate insider's guide to New York CityNew York, New York - a crazy quilt of evolving neighborhoods, trends, and tastes, and home to natives and newcomers of every nationality, ethnicity, and outlook. New York City's history and grand ambitions live in every street, park, and hidden alleyway. This unusual guidebook invites the adventurous and curious to explore a wildly diverse selection of little-known places, including: a trapeze school, a giant Buddha in a former porno theater, a Coney Island sideshow, Louis Armstrong's home, a Central Park croquet court, a Gatsby-era speakeasy, and a secret balcony where slaves worshipped 200 years ago. Play chess with the masters on a Midtown office-tower wall; have a pint at a legendary prizefighter's hangout in Soho; whisper messages across a crowded train station. Unexpected and quirky, most of these destinations are so under-the-radar they will astound even longtime New Yorkers who thought they knew it all!


New York ( Book)

Black-and-white urban photography has a unique effect: It can lend a historical feel or bring out perspectives and surfaces in a special way. Serge Ramelli's New York photos do both--and much more. With his film director's eye, he searches out locations using parameters that evoke a specific atmosphere and build tension. The New York skyline or typical New York street scenes are stylized into a stage--but a stage where nothing is required to happen. Their impressiveness is so heightened that a movie automatically plays in the viewer's head. With New York boasting so much history and evocativeness, nothing more is needed. Although he is similar to Ansel Adams in technique and expression, Serge Ramelli is a contemporary photographer in every sense of the word, constantly experimenting with new technical options.


Highbrow, Lowbrow, Brilliant, Despicable: Fifty Years of New York Magazine (The Editors of New York Magazine Book)

New York, the city. New York, the magazine. A celebration.The great story of New York City in the past half-century has been its near collapse and miraculous rebirth. A battered town left for dead, one that almost a million people abandoned and where those who remained had to live behind triple deadbolt locks, was reinvigorated by the twinned energies of starving artists and financial white knights. Over the next generation, the city was utterly transformed. It again became the capital of wealth and innovation, an engine of cultural vibrancy, a magnet for immigrants, and a city of endless possibility. It was the place to be—if you could afford it.Since its founding in 1968, New York Magazine has told the story of that city’s constant morphing, week after week. Covering culture high and low, the drama and scandal of politics and finance, through jubilant moments and immense tragedies, the magazine has hit readers where they live, with a sensibility as fast and funny and urbane as New York itself. From its early days publishing writers like Tom Wolfe, Jimmy Breslin, and Gloria Steinem to its modern incarnation as a laboratory of inventive magazine-making, New York has had an extraordinary knack for catching the Zeitgeist and getting it on the page. It was among the originators of the New Journalism, publishing legendary stories whose authors infiltrated a Black Panther party in Leonard Bernstein’s apartment, introduced us to the mother-daughter hermits living in the dilapidated estate known as Grey Gardens, launched Ms. Magazine, branded a group of up-and-coming teen stars “the Brat Pack,” and effectively ended the career of Roger Ailes. Again and again, it introduced new words into the conversation—from “foodie” to “normcore”—and spotted fresh talent before just about anyone.Along the way, those writers and their colleagues revealed what was most interesting at the forward edge of American culture—from the old Brooklyn of Saturday Night Fever to the new Brooklyn of artisanal food trucks, from the Wall Street crashes to the hedge-fund spoils, from The Godfather to Girls—in ways that were knowing, witty, sometimes weird, occasionally vulgar, and often unforgettable. On “The Approval Matrix,” the magazine’s beloved back-page feature, New York itself would fall at the crossroads of highbrow and lowbrow, and more brilliant than despicable. (Most of the time.)Marking the magazine’s fiftieth birthday, Highbrow, Lowbrow, Brilliant, Despicable: 50 Years of New York draws from all that coverage to present an enormous, sweeping, idiosyncratic picture of a half-century at the center of the world. Through stories and images of power and money, movies and food, crises and family life, it constitutes an unparalleled history of that city’s transformation, and of a New York City institution as well. It is packed with behind-the-scenes stories from New York’s writers, editors, designers, and journalistic subjects—and frequently overflows its own pages onto spectacular foldouts. It’s a big book for a big town.


Humans of New York (Brandon Stanton Book)


The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York (Robert A. Caro Audible)

Everywhere acknowledged as a modern American classic, winner of the Pulitzer Prize, and chosen by the Modern Library as one of the hundred greatest books of the 20th century, The Power Broker is a galvanizing biography revealing not only the saga of one man's incredible accumulation of power, but the story of the shaping (and mis-shaping) of New York in the 20th century.Robert Caro's monumental book makes public what few outsiders knew: that Robert Moses was the single most powerful man of his time in the City and in the State of New York. And in telling the Moses story, Caro both opens up to an unprecedented degree the way in which politics really happens - the way things really get done in America's city halls and statehouses - and brings to light a bonanza of vital information about such national figures as Alfred E. Smith and Franklin D. Roosevelt (and the genesis of their blood feud), about Fiorello La Guardia, John V. Lindsay and Nelson Rockefeller.But The Power Broker is first and foremost a brilliant multidimensional portrait of a man - an extraordinary man who, denied power within the normal framework of the democratic process, stepped outside that framework to grasp power sufficient to shape a great city and to hold sway over the very texture of millions of lives. We see how Moses began: the handsome, intellectual young heir to the world of Our Crowd, an idealist. How, rebuffed by the entrenched political establishment, he fought for the power to accomplish his ideals. How he first created a miraculous flowering of parks and parkways, playlands and beaches - and then ultimately brought down on the city the smog-choked aridity of our urban landscape, the endless miles of (never sufficient) highway, the hopeless sprawl of Long Island, the massive failures of public housing, and countless other barriers to humane living. How, inevitably, the accumulation of power became an end in itself.Moses built an empire and lived like an emperor. He was held in fear - his dossiers could disgorge the dark secrets of anyone who opposed him. He was, he claimed, above politics, above deals; and through decade after decade, the newspapers and the public believed.Meanwhile, he was developing his public authorities into a fourth branch of government known as "Triborough" - a government whose records were closed to the public, whose policies and plans were decided not by voters or elected officials but solely by Moses - an immense economic force directing pressure on labor unions, on banks, on all the city's political and economic institutions, and on the press, and on the Church. He doled out millions of dollars' worth of legal fees, insurance commissions, lucrative contracts on the basis of who could best pay him back in the only coin he coveted: power. He dominated the politics and politicians of his time - without ever having been elected to any office. He was, in essence, above our democratic system.Robert Moses held power in the state for 44 years, through the governorships of Smith, Roosevelt, Lehman, Dewey, Harriman, and Rockefeller, and in the city for 34 years, through the mayoralties of La Guardia, O'Dwyer, Impellitteri, Wagner, and Lindsay. He personally conceived and carried through public works costing $27 billion - he was undoubtedly America's greatest builder.This is how he built and dominated New York - before, finally, he was stripped of his reputation (by the press) and of his power (by Nelson Rockefeller). But his work, and his will, had been done.


This Is New York (Miroslav Sasek Book)

With the same wit and perception that distinguished his stylish books on Paris, London, and Rome, M. Sasek pictures fabulous, big-hearted New York City in This Is New York, first published in 1960 and now updated for the 21st century.  The Dutchman who bought the island of Manhattan from the Native Americnas in 1626 for twenty-four dollars' worth of handy housewares little knew that his was the biggest bargain in American history.  For everything about New York is big -- the buildings, the traffic jams, the cars, the stories, the Sunday papers.  Here is the Staten Island Ferry, the Statute of Liberty, MacDougal Alley in Greenwich Village, Times Square, Rockefeller Center, Harlem, Chinatown, Central Park. The brass,  the beauty, the magic, This Is New York!


Seeking New York: The Stories Behind the Historic Architecture of Manhattan--One Building at a Time (Tom Miller Book)

Beautifully illustrated with line drawings and photographs, engagingly presented, and richly detailed, this charming guide traces the architectural and social history of Manhattan one building at a time. The island of Manhattan has been through remarkable architectural and social change throughout its history. Organized roughly by neighborhoods, this book explores the seemingly never-ending depths of architectural, personal, and social history of Manhattan, building by building. Follow the family feud that led to the construction of the luxurious Waldorf Astoria, or trace the decay of a once proud home to an increasingly humble storefront, delving into the surprising, sometimes scandalous, often touching stories of the people who lived there along the way. Alongside the details about each architect, dates, and styles, author Tom Miller reveals the joys, tragedies, and scandals of those who lived within. In addition to iconic structures, the book includes many off-the-beaten-path buildings that most guidebooks overlook, as well as notable buildings that no longer stand but remain key to Manhattan’s architectural history. Beautifully researched, engagingly presented, and richly detailed, Seeking New York is truly a must-read for anyone interested in the story of New York and how it got that way.