Find the books that you like!

 

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life (Mark Manson Book)

#1 New York Times BestsellerOver 2 million copies soldIn this generation-defining self-help guide, a superstar blogger cuts through the crap to show us how to stop trying to be "positive" all the time so that we can truly become better, happier people.For decades, we’ve been told that positive thinking is the key to a happy, rich life. "F**k positivity," Mark Manson says. "Let’s be honest, shit is f**ked and we have to live with it." In his wildly popular Internet blog, Manson doesn’t sugarcoat or equivocate. He tells it like it is—a dose of raw, refreshing, honest truth that is sorely lacking today. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F**k is his antidote to the coddling, let’s-all-feel-good mindset that has infected modern society and spoiled a generation, rewarding them with gold medals just for showing up. Manson makes the argument, backed both by academic research and well-timed poop jokes, that improving our lives hinges not on our ability to turn lemons into lemonade, but on learning to stomach lemons better. Human beings are flawed and limited—"not everybody can be extraordinary, there are winners and losers in society, and some of it is not fair or your fault." Manson advises us to get to know our limitations and accept them. Once we embrace our fears, faults, and uncertainties, once we stop running and avoiding and start confronting painful truths, we can begin to find the courage, perseverance, honesty, responsibility, curiosity, and forgiveness we seek. There are only so many things we can give a f**k about so we need to figure out which ones really matter, Manson makes clear. While money is nice, caring about what you do with your life is better, because true wealth is about experience. A much-needed grab-you-by-the-shoulders-and-look-you-in-the-eye moment of real-talk, filled with entertaining stories and profane, ruthless humor, The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F**k is a refreshing slap for a generation to help them lead contented, grounded lives.


Summary of The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life by Mark Manson (CompanionReads Book)

Get your CompanionReads Summary of Mark Manson’s The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck and read it today in less than 30 minutes!Attention: This is a supplementary guide meant to enhance your reading experience of Mark Manson’s The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck. It is not the original book nor is it intended to replace the original book. You may purchase the original book here: http://bit.ly/mansonsartIn this fast guide you'll be taken by the hand through a summary and analysis ofThe main points made by the authorAn organized chapter by chapter synopsisReferences to noteworthy people mentionedThe author’s most valuable tips, websites, books, and toolsMost CompanionReads may be read in 30 minutes.This book is meant for anyone who is interested in enhancing their reading experience. It will give you deeper insight, fresher perspectives, and help you squeeze more enjoyment out of your book. Perfect for a quick refresh on the main ideas or when you want to use it as a topic of conversation at your next meeting.Enjoy this edition instantly on your Kindle deviceEnjoy this edition instantly on your Kindle device!Now available in paperback, digital, and audio editions.Sign up for our newsletter to get notified about our new books atwww.companionreads.com/gift


The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia (Yale Agrarian Studies Series) (James C. Scott Book)

For two thousand years the disparate groups that now reside in Zomia (a mountainous region the size of Europe that consists of portions of seven Asian countries) have fled the projects of the organized state societies that surround them—slavery, conscription, taxes, corvée labor, epidemics, and warfare. This book, essentially an “anarchist history,” is the first-ever examination of the huge literature on state-making whose author evaluates why people would deliberately and reactively remain stateless. Among the strategies employed by the people of Zomia to remain stateless are physical dispersion in rugged terrain; agricultural practices that enhance mobility; pliable ethnic identities; devotion to prophetic, millenarian leaders; and maintenance of a largely oral culture that allows them to reinvent their histories and genealogies as they move between and around states. In accessible language, James Scott, recognized worldwide as an eminent authority in Southeast Asian, peasant, and agrarian studies, tells the story of the peoples of Zomia and their unlikely odyssey in search of self-determination. He redefines our views on Asian politics, history, demographics, and even our fundamental ideas about what constitutes civilization, and challenges us with a radically different approach to history that presents events from the perspective of stateless peoples and redefines state-making as a form of “internal colonialism.” This new perspective requires a radical reevaluation of the civilizational narratives of the lowland states. Scott’s work on Zomia represents a new way to think of area studies that will be applicable to other runaway, fugitive, and marooned communities, be they Gypsies, Cossacks, tribes fleeing slave raiders, Marsh Arabs, or San-Bushmen.


The Not So Subtle Art of Being A Fat Girl: Loving the Skin You're In (Tess Holliday Book)

Plus-­size supermodel Tess Holliday’s passionate plea for modern women, whoever they are, is to be comfortable in their own skin. In her first book, she shares her powerful personal story and offers inspiration and tips to women everywhere that will help them not merely survive, but thrive and chart their own course to acceptance, power, and true beauty.MOM. FEMINIST. PLUS SIZE. SUPERMODEL. LOUD. PROUD. BODY ACTIVIST. BEAUTIFUL. BUSINESS WOMAN. HOMEMAKER. CAT OWNER. FUNNY. OUTSPOKEN. WIFE. DAUGHTER. LOVER. FIGHTER. SURVIVOR. #effyourbeautystandards. Tess Holliday is many things and perfect is not one of them. But she loves her imperfections—after all, they’ve formed the woman she is today. Tess’s number one rule in life is to love yourself ­no matter who you are, what your faults may be, where you come from, or what dress size you wear! It’s this discovery that has helped her through life—from being abused and bullied about her weight, to raising a kid alone and fending off social media trolls. Now here in this amusingly candid account, the woman at the forefront of the body positive movement—who has been credited with transforming the fashion industry—explains why you should be happy to make mistakes but how to properly learn from them, as well as how to love your imperfections and be comfortable in your own skin, ­no matter how much you have.


The French Art of Not Giving a Sh*t: Cut the Crap and Live Your Life (Fabrice Midal Book)

It's time to stop giving a sh*t! Be calm... Stop stressing... Embrace the universe... Try yoga... Be fulfilled... and that's an order! We're overwhelmed with these sorts of commands, and we often torture ourselves to "try harder," yet somehow we never feel we've done quite enough. It's about time we stop pushing ourselves to do what we think we're supposed to do, and instead simply allow ourselves to be angry, be tired, be silly, be passionate--to stop giving a shit, and just be. An international bestseller (now in English for the first time), The French Art of Not Giving a Sh*t by Fabrice Midal explains why the key to true mindfulness is freeing ourselves from social and often self-imposed stresses--and highlights how we can embrace life more fully by giving ourselves a break. He gives readers permission to: Stop obeying -- you are intelligent Stop being calm -- be at peace Stop wanting to be perfect -- accept life's storms Stop rationalizing -- let things be Stop comparing -- be you Stop being ashamed -- be vulnerable Stop tormenting yourself -- become your own best friend Stop wanting to love -- be benevolent One of the world's leading teachers of meditation and mindfulness, Midal offers us a new solution to the perennial problem of our too-much, too-fast modern life. It's OK, he urges us, to say no. It's fine to quit the things that don't fulfill you. It's necessary, in fact, to give ourselves a break and say, simply, c'est la vie. In The French Art of Not Giving a Sh*t, Midal gives each of us permission to stop doing the things that don't make us happy ... so we have room in our lives for the things that do.


If It's Not Funny It's Art (Demetri Martin Book)

New York Times bestselling author of This Is a Book and Point Your Face at This, Demetri Martin is back with another collection of hilarious drawings: IF IT'S NOT FUNNY IT'S ARTPacked with hundreds of new illustrations and one-liners, IF IT'S NOT FUNNY IT'S ART is a peek into the ingenious mind of author/comedian/filmmaker Demetri Martin. Exploring the meaning of art, life, death, ennui and the elegant fart joke with a sensibility all its own, this collection is a perfect gift for word lovers, art appreciators and fans of Demetri's unique brand of comedy. Sure to make you laugh out loud, and if it doesn't, then you know it's art.


Summary: The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life (Elizabeth Keen Book)

Charles Bukowski was a popular author and poet, but his rise to fame was difficult. He was a drunk and he was crude. He was middle-aged by the time someone published one of his novels. However, fame did not change Bukowski. He continued to live the drunken life of a loser. His writing was popular because it was honest. In the end, Charles Bukowski became famous because he didn’t care what other people thought of him. Our culture defines success by how much stuff we have. The more we have, the better life we must lead. The problem is that society tells us what we need by reminding us what we lack. We become dissatisfied with our current situation, and strive to get whatever is bigger and better. While this is a good strategy if you’re a business, as a consumer it causes us to never be content with what we have. Advertisements tell us to give a fuck about everything, because it’s good for their businesses. The author urges us to give a fuck about only the important things in life...


Building Communities, Not Audiences: The Future of the Arts in the United States (Doug Borwick Book)

Building Communities, Not Audiences: The Future of the Arts in the U.S , written and edited by Doug Borwick, holds that established arts organizations, for practical and moral reasons, need to be more deeply connected to their communities. It serves as an essential primer for any member of the arts community–artist, administrator, board member, patron, or friend–who is interested in the future of the arts in the U.S. It also provides new ways of looking at the arts as a powerful force for building better communities and improving lives. “It is from community that the arts developed and it is in serving communities that the arts will thrive . . . Communities do not exist to serve the arts; the arts exist to serve communities.” Building Communities, Not Audiences identifies the factors that serve to isolate established arts organizations from their communities, points out the trends that loom as imminent threats to the long-term viability of the artistic status quo, and presents principles and mechanisms whereby arts organizations can significantly extend their reach into the community, supporting enhanced sustainability. Included are case studies and examples of successful community engagement work being conducted by arts organizations from around the U.S. Twenty-three contributors, representing chamber music, dance, museums, opera, orchestras, and theatre as well as an array of arts administration perspectives provide breadth of coverage. “The economic, social, and political environments out of which the infrastructure for Western ‘high arts’ grew have changed. Today’s major arts institutions, products of that legacy, no longer benefit from relatively inexpensive labor, a nominally homogeneous culture, or a polity openly managed by an elite class. Expenses are rising precipitously and competition for major donors is increasing; as a result, the survival of established arts organizations hinges on their ability to engage effectively with a far broader segment of the population than has been true to date.” -------------------------- From the Foreword by Rocco Landesman, Chairman, National Endowment for the Arts: “I think the days of the arts in ivory towers are behind us; the very best arts organizations are . . . connecting communities with artists . . . . Not only can the arts build communities, I think we must.” From the Foreword by Robert L. Lynch, President & CEO, Americans for the Arts: “Doug Borwick calls for substantive rather than superficial efforts, authentic and systemic changes. . . . The challenge is not whether to build communities or audiences but how to build communities and audiences together.” -------------------------- Contributors: Barbara Schaffer Bacon: Co-Director, Animating Democracy Sandra Bernhard: Director/HGOco, Houston Grand Opera Susan Badger Booth: Professor, Eastern Michigan University Tom Borrup: Principal, Creative Community Builders Ben Cameron: Program Director for the Arts, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation William Cleveland: Director, Center for the Study of Art and Community Lyz Crane: Community Development Consultant David Dombrosky: CMO/InstantEncore Maryo Gard Ewell: Community Arts Consultant Tom Finkelpearl: Executive Director, Queens Museum of Art Pam Korza: Co-Director, Animating Democracy Denise Kulawik: Principal, Oneiros, LLC Helen Lessick: Artist, Civic Art Advocate Dorothy Gunther Pugh: Founder & Artistic Director, Ballet Memphis Stephanie Moore: Arts and Culture Researcher Diane Ragsdale: Cultural Critic, Speaker, Writer Noel Raymond: Co-Director, Pillsbury House Theatre, St. Paul, MN Preranna Reddy: Director-Public Events, Queens Museum of Art Sebastian Ruth: Founder/Artistic Director, Community MusicWorks, Providence, RI Russell Willis Taylor: President & CEO, National Arts Strategies James Undercofler: Professor, Drexel University; former President/CEO, Philadelphia Orchestra Roseann Weiss: Director, CAT Institute, Regional Arts Commission, St. Louis, MO


The Life-Changing Magic of Not Giving a F*ck: How to Stop Spending Time You Don't Have with People You Don't Like Doing Things You Don't Want to Do (A No F*cks Given Guide) (Sarah Knight Book)

The Life Changing Magic of Not Giving A F ck How to Stop Spending Time You Don t Have with People You Don t Like Doing Things You Don t Want to Do


Speaking of Jesus: The Art of Not-Evangelism (Carl Medearis Book)

 Some of us fear moments when we need to defend our theology. Some of us seek them out. But we are seldom ready the way Jesus seemed to be ready. So how do we draw others to God in the midst of these ordinary conversations the way Jesus did? In Speaking of Jesus, Carl Medearis draws on his experience of international reconciliation between Muslims and Christians to remind us of the heart of the matter: Jesus. Here he gives us tools, stories, and the foundation we need to move beyond “us” and “them” and simply talk about the One who changes it all. As Carl writes, “While others are explaining and defending various isms and ologies we’re simply pointing people to our friend. The one who uncovers and disarms. Who leads people right to himself. The beginning and the end of the story. A good story indeed.”